The chugging holes in the brain

The chugging holes in the brain

This time, the focus was not on the family members or caregivers, but on the people affected and their dementia: at the beginning of dementia week, pastoral advisor johanna schiebl gave a talk to the seniors’ advisory council on the decline of personality.
Johanna schiebl tells of a home resident who is completely exhausted at 5 p.M. Because she thinks she is expected in the stables, but sees no chance of getting there because she is in the wheelchair sitting. Schiebl: "this lady despairs of and in the world she lives in." But understanding and patient nursing staff knew how to calm the woman – with a trick. They said a farmhand helped in the stable.
"I want to go home, is a common phrase that dementia patients stereotypically say, even if they have been living in the same home for ten years. Since the affected people mentally live in the time when they were 30 or 40 years old and had a family to take care of and believe that they still have to do this, but are not able to, they experience a double need.
The pastoral advisor is concerned about recognizing what moves dementia patients. She wanted society to understand the disease and those affected by it. "Dementia patients have a life story, they have helped to build our state, they have lived, loved and suffered, schiebl pointed out.
The affected person perceives the onset of the disease and suffers from the loss of competence, identity and self-worth. Compensatory behavior is the well-known consequence: the affected persons build up a facade, trivialize, avoid what they are no longer able to accomplish and concentrate on an "alternative" as a means of support which, in time, becomes a "huge overload" for them illustration. Automated activities such as walking, cycling or baking cakes remain, as does the knowledge of general or historical data or the ability to count. One’s own biography, the knowledge about oneself, also remains stored in long-term memory. It’s different with short-term memory. New information can no longer be correctly assigned and quickly becomes confused in the case of dementia. The world slips away with the loss of cognitive abilities. This represents the greatest threat to people and their health. "You are what you remember" – this quoted title sums up dementia as a disease.
Schiebl looked at many nodding and approving faces. Everyone knows someone with dementia who exhibits the behaviors described.
The cognitive abilities of dementia patients decline, but their emotional life remains largely intact. Not only do they still experience the sensual experiences of taste and touch, but they also experience worry, anger and joy.
Not least against the background that it can affect anyone, johanna schiebl called for more recognition of dementia patients in society and good framework conditions for professional and home care. The quality of life depends less on the severity than on the environment and society. Perceiving the person with dementia as a cost factor "very quickly leads to considerations of a life that is not worth living" in general. The door was opened to euthanasia. According to schiebl, it is not dementia itself that is the bane of humanity, but the "creeping revaluation and desolidarization of society".
Drastic remarks such as "that’s no life anymore" were generally heard, when the path of life is thwarted by disability or serious illness.
How to behave properly? Above all, patience, respect and the ability to bear one’s own helplessness are needed. With a view to the program of the health city of bad bruckenau, the question remains open for johanna schiebl: "how do we deal with illness??" Dementia and finiteness were not in man’s hands.

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